No Kidding: Test Your Ed-Knowledge with Our April Fools' Quiz

No Kidding: Test Your Ed-Knowledge with Our April Fools' Quiz


April showers bring May flowers. But since we here in California lack rain and water (that's no joke), we'll bring you a dash of April Fools' humor instead. No fair clicking on the links before you score yourself. This is high-stakes assessment, folks. 

1. Which of the following were considered grounds for suspension in US schools?

a) Riding a horse (named Romeo) into the school yard in order to invite a girl to the senior prom

b) Slicing an apple during a “healthy snacks” presentation

c) Saying “Bless you!” after a fellow student sneezed

d) Threatening to make a classmate disappear by using a ring forged in the fires of Mount Doom

e) All of the above

2. A new domain extension, “.college” is now available. But it’s not limited just to schools and universities. Which one of these company domains has already been registered?






3. Celebrities’ wallets have recently opened for edtech startups. Three out the four celebrities below have invested in an edtech company. Who’s the outlier?

4. Which of the following is not a real class at an accredited university?

b) Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse (Michigan State University)

d) Stupidity (Occidental College)

5. According to the Internet, what's the Common Core affecting now?

e) none of the above: It will help America top the PISA ranks. 

f) all of the above

6. Match the YouTube video with the number of views

7. Fact or fiction?

a) Research has shown that Fisher Price was recently credited with triggering an unusual perception phenomenon: “Grapheme synesthesia,” the condition in which people perceive letters or numbers as having colors. Turns out that more than a few kids who stared at refrigerator magnets when growing up think the letter “A” is red.

b) Sending your robot to school is an increasingly popular alternative to actually showing up for class. Companies such as Double Robot are enjoying a hockeystick of growth as students and teachers embrace robots in class. “We still get to have ‘seat time’ and so keep our funding,” says Angela Powers, school principal. “And it’s much easier to manage a class of robots than flesh-and-blood kindergartners.” For students who have trouble sitting still, being represented by a robot means they don’t get in trouble--and they can still listen in on instruction. “Love my BigBot,” declares Jon Twins, age 7.


  1. e
  2. b
  3. b
  4. c
  5. f
  6. 1-c; 2-a; 3-b; 4-d
  7. a-fact; b-fiction, for now. 
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